Action Plan:  [PFT Plan - Status: Approved]

Title: Positive Youth Development (5 C's)
    


Program Year:   2013-2014
Program Focus Team: Youth Development



Strategic Opportunities Addressed:
  • Prepare People in Kansas to Thrive in a Global Society and All Aspects of Life



Situation:

Most Kansas youth are healthy, are connected to their families, schools and communities and are on the path to becoming contributing and caring adults. However, there are areas of concern. For example, 15% of Kansas children between 6th and 12th grades report binge drinking (5 or more alcoholic drinks) in one sitting, an increasing number of Kansas youth attempt suicide each year, nearly 10,000 military-connected youth in Kansas experience the transitions associated with multiple deployments, 16% of our children are overweight, 11% don�t get enough exercise and growing numbers are not completing high school.

Nationally, employers report that more and more high school students lack the skills needed for work. Those skills include decision making, goal setting and leadership. It�s troubling that only four in ten young people are really doing well, meaning they are in school, working, healthy and are connected to their community (Gambone, Connell and Klem, 2002). These concerns are echoed in Kansas where a 2007 K-State Research and Extension statewide survey of 2,065 people revealed that it was very or somewhat important to help youth ages 10-19 years old �avoid harmful behavior� (89%) and �master positive life skills� (91%).

It is vital that Kansas youth are equipped with the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to lead productive and contributing lives. The United States Administration for Children and Families agrees that a positive youth development approach is necessary when helping young people achieve their full potential. Organizations and communities that promote Positive Youth Development give youth opportunities to exercise leadership, build skills, establish healthy relationships and get involved. �The self-confidence, trust and practical knowledge that young people gain from positive opportunities in their communities help them grow into healthy, happy and self-sufficient adults,� (HHS/ACF,2008).

Most experts agree that the goals of Positive Youth Development are the �5 Cs: Competence, Confidence, Connection, Character (development) and Caring.� Conceptualized by Dr. Karen Pittman the �5 Cs� were refined by a team of leading researchers headed by Dr. Richard Lerner, Tufts University.   The �5 Cs� serve: 1) as a guide for interacting positively with youth; 2) as benchmarks for designing effective programs; and, 3) for the long term results of positive youth development practices. The �5 Cs� are substantiated by the �4-H Study of Positive Youth Development,� an 8 year longitudinal study of school-aged youth in the United States. A child or adolescent who develops each of the �5 Cs� is considered to be thriving.  Developmental scientists believe that these thriving youth develop a sixth �C� which is Contribution to self, family, community and civil society (Child Trends, 2008).


Public Value:
When you support K-State Research and Extension Positive Youth Development Programs, youth participants will develop strong work force skills, life skills and be contributing adults in society.

Outputs:
  • 4-H Project groups
  • 4-H Clubs
  • 4-H Camps
  • 4-H Teams
  • 4-H Activities and Events
  • Long term continuous contact with a caring adult
  • 4-H After School Programs
  • 4-H School Enrichment
  • 4-H SPIN Clubs
 
Outcomes:

 Short-Term (Knowledge):

Youth increase their awareness and knowledge of positive youth development, adopt new or different attitudes; develop opinions, new aspirations and/or new motivation related to:

  • Competence � ability to act effectively in school, in social situations and at work;
  • Confidence � an internal sense of overall self-worth and efficacy;
  • Connection � positive bonds with people and social institutions;
  • Character � respect for society and cultural rules, an inner moral compass; and
  • Caring � a sense of sympathy and empathy for others and a commitment to social justice. 

(The Good Teen. Lerner, Richard M., 2007. Crown Publishing Group, New York.)


Evaluation Questions:

Or Target Indicators:

  • Percentage of youth who increased their knowledge about mastery of skills
  • Percentage of youth who increased their knowledge, awareness and skills about self-awareness
  • Percentage of youth who learned how to build healthy interpersonal relationships
  • Percentage of youth who increased their awareness and attitude for developing positive interpersonal skills
  • Percentage of youth who increased their awareness and knowledge of serving others

Evaluation Question/Measurement Instrument Sources:

  • 4-H Common Measures - Universal Items
  • Positive Youth Development Very Short Form - Younger Adolescents (Tufts University, 2013)
  • Positive Youth Development Very Short Form:  Older Adolescents (Tufts University, 2013)



 Medium-Term (Behavior):

Youth use and act on their skills attributed to positive youth development, i.e., practice new behaviors or demonstrate new positive youth development abilities. (The Good Teen. Lerner, Richard M., 2007. Crown Publishing Group, New York.)

 


Evaluation Questions:

Or Target Indicators:

  • Percentage of youth participating in opportunities to demonstrate competence such as project groups, competitions, academic achievements, etc.
  • Percentage of youth practicing an internal sense of self worth
  • Percentage of youth consistently participating in clubs, teams, groups
  • Percentage of youth consistently demonstrating ethical behavior in society
  • Percentage of youth consistently leading and participating in meaningful service-learning opportunities

Evaluation Question/Measurement Instrument Sources:

  • 4-H Common Measures - Universal Items
  • Positive Youth Development Very Short Form - Younger Adolescents (Tufts University, 2013)
  • Positive Youth Development Very Short Form:  Older Adolescents (Tufts University, 2013)



 Long-Term (Condition):

All youth will grow up fully prepared for and fully engaged in life by having the ability to participate effectively by caring for themselves and by giving of themselves at home, in the community and in civic life. (The Good Teen. Lerner, Richard M., 2007. Crown Publishing Group, New York.)


Evaluation Questions:

Or Target Indicators:

  • Youth are effective participants socially, at work and in school
  • Youth are independent and self-confident
  • Youth identify with people, social settings and everyday life
  • Youth are law abiding citizens and contribute positively to society
  • Youth are sympathetic and empathic to others
  • Youth are generous with their time, resources and compassion toward community and other people

Evaluation Question/Measurement Instrument Sources:

  • 4-H Common Measures - Universal Items
  • Positive Youth Development Very Short Form - Younger Adolescents (Tufts University, 2013)
  • Positive Youth Development Very Short Form:  Older Adolescents (Tufts University, 2013)

 
Plan Contacts:
  • Schlichting, Susan - Extension Agent , Ellis County Extension
  • Stone, Barbara - Department Head , 4-H Youth Development
  • Waldren, Deryl - Instructor , Northwest Area Extension Office
       

  • Updated: 5/29/18